Dominica Travel Information

Photo Dominica was the last of the Caribbean islands to be colonized by Europeans, due chiefly to the fierce resistance of the native Caribs. France ceded possession to Great Britain in 1763, which made the island a colony in 1805. In 1980, two years after independence, Dominica's fortunes improved when a corrupt and tyrannical administration was replaced by that of Mary Eugenia CHARLES, the first female prime minister in the Caribbean, who remained in office for 15 years. Some 3,000 Carib Indians still living on Dominica are the only pre-Columbian population remaining in the eastern Caribbean.

PEOPLE
Almost all Dominicans are descendants of African slaves brought in by colonial planters in the 18th century. Dominica is the only island in the eastern Caribbean to retain some of its pre-Columbian population--the Carib Indians--about 3,000 of whom live on the island's east coast. The population growth rate is very low, due primarily to emigration to more prosperous Caribbean Islands, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Canada.

HISTORY
The island's indigenous Arawak people were expelled or exterminated by Caribs in the 14th century. Columbus landed there in November 1493. Spanish ships frequently landed on Dominica during the 16th century, but fierce resistance by the Caribs discouraged Spain's efforts at settlement.

ECONOMY
Agriculture, with bananas as the principal crop, is still Dominica's economic mainstay. Banana production employs, directly or indirectly, upwards of one-third of the work force. This sector is highly vulnerable to weather conditions and to external events affecting commodity prices.

U.S.-DOMINICAN RELATIONS
The United States and Dominica have friendly bilateral relations. The United States supports the Dominican Government's efforts to expand its economic base and to provide a higher standard of living for its citizens. U.S. assistance is primarily channeled through multilateral agencies such as the World Bank, the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), and through the newly opened USAID satellite programs in Bridgetown, Barbados.

U.S.-DOMINICAN RELATIONS
The United States and Dominica have friendly bilateral relations. The United States supports the Dominican Government's efforts to expand its economic base and to provide a higher standard of living for its citizens. U.S. assistance is primarily channeled through multilateral agencies such as the World Bank, the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), and through the newly opened USAID satellite programs in Bridgetown, Barbados.

Important: Travel to Dominica may require a travel visa. Whether a visa is required for travel depends on citizenship and purpose of journey. Please be sure to review Travisa's Dominica visa instructions for details. Visa instructions for other countries are available on our do I need a visa page.

Country Statistics

Full country name: Commonwealth of Dominica
Capital city: Roseau
Area: 751 sq km
Population: 73,126
Ethnic groups: black 86.8%, mixed 8.9%, Carib Amerindian 2.9%, white 0.8%, other 0.7%
Languages: English
Religions: Roman Catholic 61.4%, Protestant 20.6%
Government: parliamentary democracy
Chief of State: President Eliud WILLIAMS
Head of Government: Prime Minister Roosevelt SKERRIT
GDP: 1.014 billion
GDP per captia: 14,300
Annual growth rate: 1%
Inflation: 2.8%
Agriculture: bananas, citrus, mangos, root crops, coconuts, cocoa
Major industries: soap, coconut oil, tourism, copra, furniture, cement blocks, shoes
Natural resources: timber, hydropower, arable land
Location: Caribbean, island between the Caribbean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, about half way between Puerto Rico and Trinidad and Tobago
Trade Partners - exports: Japan 46.2%, Antigua and Barbuda 8.3%, Jamaica 7.3%, Guyana 7%, Trinidad and Tobago 4.5%
Trade Partners - imports: Japan 34.2%, US 15.7%, Trinidad and Tobago 13.9%, China 5.7%, Singapore 5.5%